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College of Education

College of Education
006 Bluemont Hall
1114 Mid-Campus Drive North
Kansas State University
Manhattan, KS 66506

785-532-5525
785-532-7304 fax
edcoll@k-state.edu

2018 Education Symposium

A student-lead professional development day…

Dimensions of Diversity: Inclusion for All

October 11, 2018
K-State Student Union

Dimensions of Diversity: Inclusion for All

Registration is Closed

Refund Policy
If you must cancel your registration, please do so as soon as possible. Refunds are not available. The K-State College of Education reserves all rights for final scheduling of sessions. Fees will not be canceled for registrants who do not attend and have not notified the K-State Global Campus by the cancellation deadline.

Tentative Program

8:00-8:25 a.m.
Opening Session (Forum Hall)
Distinguished Speaker
Dr. David Griffin
, Emeritus Assistant Dean, College of Education


8:30-9:20 a.m.
Session 1

  • Explore Diverse Agriculture Careers (Room 206)
    Cathy Musick, Executive Director, Kansas Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom)
    • Connect with the Agriculture Food and Natural Resources Career Pathway that is available to students interested in the noble cause of feeding the world and increasing food security by providing a safe, nutritious, adequate and available food supply to all. This hands-on workshop will model two lesson plans and several tools of discovery that allow elementary, middle school and high school students to explore exciting career options in the food production and distribution industry. Not only is there a great diversity in type of careers that support food systems in the state, U.S. and the world, but there is great diversity in the workforce encompassing nationalities, economic levels, gender, and age. Examples will be given to illustrate the power of diversity and highlight ways representatives from diverse nations share ideas about food production including seed banks, food mills and animal genetics to increase the food supply as the world population increases exponentially. Prospective teachers will leave with a “toolbox” of resources they may use to share with students regarding applied science, math, language arts, and social studies skills towards an exciting career in food systems and agriculture.
  • Diversity in Special Education is Special (Room 227)
    Rachel Whetstone
    • In this session participants will be challenged to think about diversity in terms of the spectrum of needs students may have from mild learning disabilities to severe multiple disabilities, emotional disturbance or the autism spectrum to name just a few. How do teachers accommodate for each student's needs and what are some types of diversity special education advocates for that you may not have realized.
  • The Challenges of Economic Status in the Classroom – Food Insecurity, Social and Economic Difficulties (Cottonwood Room)
    Dr. Be Stoney, College of Education
    • The session will discuss the economic and social status and food insecurity that impacts the social-emotional development, health, academic performance, and school attendance for school-age students. As a participant, students will experience the interactive session learning how the three issues affect children who come to school hungry and are expected to be prepared to learn.
  • Military Children and Families: Another Facet of Student Needs Within Our Educational System (Big 12 Room)
    Amelia Swenby
    • Every teacher strives to understand students in their classes. We try to learn about their background and how their home lives can influence what happens on school grounds. School-age “dependents” of military personnel live what can be an interesting but often stressful existence. How educators handle these students can mean the difference between a successful educational experience, or trigger at-risk potential. Discover the most common factors among military dependent children and resources available to assist in meeting challenges that may arise.
  • Inspiring a More Inclusive AP Science Program (Flinthills Room)
    Lisa Bietau, Janet Stark, and Emma Detrixhe
    • For a variety of reasons, some that begin before a student enters kindergarten, college-preparatory classes, honors classes, and advanced placement courses across the nation are disproportionately white, Asian, and male. Although there have been state and national initiatives to bolster academic programs offered to a more diverse population, the race gap still exists in advanced courses and is even more obvious in advanced placement science courses than in other disciplines. This disparity can be attributed, in part, to a process called tracking. This session will discuss the concept of tracking and how it leads to populations in AP science courses serving a consistently less diverse population than the diversity of the school, and how we can begin to change it.

9:30-10:20 a.m.
Session 2

  • Explore Diverse Agriculture Careers (Room 206)
    Cathy Musick, Executive Director, Kansas Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom)
    • Connect with the Agriculture Food and Natural Resources Career Pathway that is available to students interested in the noble cause of feeding the world and increasing food security by providing a safe, nutritious, adequate and available food supply to all. This hands-on workshop will model two lesson plans and several tools of discovery that allow elementary, middle school and high school students to explore exciting career options in the food production and distribution industry. Not only is there a great diversity in type of careers that support food systems in the state, U.S. and the world, but there is great diversity in the workforce encompassing nationalities, economic levels, gender, and age. Examples will be given to illustrate the power of diversity and highlight ways representatives from diverse nations share ideas about food production including seed banks, food mills and animal genetics to increase the food supply as the world population increases exponentially. Prospective teachers will leave with a “toolbox” of resources they may use to share with students regarding applied science, math, language arts, and social studies skills towards an exciting career in food systems and agriculture.
  • Diversity in Special Education is Special (Room 227)
    Rachel Whetstone
    • In this session participants will be challenged to think about diversity in terms of the spectrum of needs students may have from mild learning disabilities to severe multiple disabilities, emotional disturbance or the autism spectrum to name just a few. How do teachers accommodate for each student's needs and what are some types of diversity special education advocates for that you may not have realized.
  • The Challenges of Economic Status in the Classroom – Food Insecurity, Social and Economic Difficulties (Cottonwood Room)
    Dr. Be Stoney, College of Education
    • The session will discuss the economic and social status and food insecurity that impacts the social-emotional development, health, academic performance, and school attendance for school-age students. As a participant, students will experience the interactive session learning how the three issues affect children who come to school hungry and are expected to be prepared to learn.
  • Military Children and Families: Another Facet of Student Needs Within Our Educational System (Big 12 Room)
    Amelia Swenby
    • Every teacher strives to understand students in their classes. We try to learn about their background and how their home lives can influence what happens on school grounds. School-age “dependents” of military personnel live what can be an interesting but often stressful existence. How educators handle these students can mean the difference between a successful educational experience, or trigger at-risk potential. Discover the most common factors among military dependent children and resources available to assist in meeting challenges that may arise.
  • Inspiring a More Inclusive AP Science Program (Flinthills Room)
    Lisa Bietau, Janet Stark, and Emma Detrixhe
    • For a variety of reasons, some that begin before a student enters kindergarten, college-preparatory classes, honors classes, and advanced placement courses across the nation are disproportionately white, Asian, and male. Although there have been state and national initiatives to bolster academic programs offered to a more diverse population, the race gap still exists in advanced courses and is even more obvious in advanced placement science courses than in other disciplines. This disparity can be attributed, in part, to a process called tracking. This session will discuss the concept of tracking and how it leads to populations in AP science courses serving a consistently less diverse population than the diversity of the school, and how we can begin to change it.

10:30-11:50 a.m.
Hause Creativity Lecture (Forum Hall)
Kansas Teachers of the Year


12:00-12:50 p.m.
Lunch (Grand Ballroom)


1:00-2:00 p.m.
Film: Refuge in the Heartland (Forum Hall)

  • "Refuge in the Heartland", a landmark film shares the experiences of refugees students, families, educators, resettlement agencies, policy makers, and commmunity partners in an effort to assist people around world in their work with refugee children and their families.

2:00-2:30 p.m.
Film Debriefing (Forum Hall)
Trina Harlow and Rusty Earl, College of Education


2:40-3:30 p.m.
Session 3

  • International Teaching: Opening the World Through Teaching (Big 12 Room)
    Dr. Suzanne Porath, College of Education
    • International teaching provides educators with the opportunity to experience new places, people, and cultures while teaching. There are a variety of pathways into international teaching including DoDEA (Department of Defense), teaching English at private schools/companies, or seeking a position in an International or American School. Dr. Porath will provide an overview of each path and then talk about her own experiences as an international educator in Brazil, Lithuania, and Aruba.
  • Special Populations in the Classroom – Refugee, Migrant and Immigrant Children (Flinthills Room)
    Doug Boline, Kansas Migrant Education Program State Director, and Rebecca Beech
    • Migrant families are a highly mobile population and migrant lifestyle creates many obstacles for migrant children.The Kansas Migrant Education Program is designed to address the unique needs of identified migrant children and their families.
  • Parent and Teacher Relationship (Cottonwood Room)
    Diana Crump June
    • The presentation will provide new educators with strategies to open and maintain quality communication between home and school.
  • Health and Mental Health Issues in the Classroom (Room 227)
    Dr. Judy Hughey
  • Case Study in Diversity: Developing a Strengths Based Classroom Perspective (Wildcat Chambers)
    Alaina Shelton
    • In this session we will examine the value of operating from a strengths-based perspective and we will analyze some of the tools we can use to shift away from a deficit-perspective. We will look at case studies from a teacher perspective on a variety of situations and share ideas, challenges, questions, and stories which will add to our understanding of the power and value of a strengths-based approach.

3:40-4:30 p.m.
Session 4

  • International Teaching: Opening the World Through Teaching (Big 12 Room)
    Dr. Suzanne Porath, College of Education
    • International teaching provides educators with the opportunity to experience new places, people, and cultures while teaching. There are a variety of pathways into international teaching including DoDEA (Department of Defense), teaching English at private schools/companies, or seeking a position in an International or American School. Dr. Porath will provide an overview of each path and then talk about her own experiences as an international educator in Brazil, Lithuania, and Aruba.
  • Special Populations in the Classroom – Refugee, Migrant and Immigrant Children (Flinthills Room)
    Doug Boline, Kansas Migrant Education Program State Director, and Rebecca Beech
    • Migrant families are a highly mobile population and migrant lifestyle creates many obstacles for migrant children.The Kansas Migrant Education Program is designed to address the unique needs of identified migrant children and their families.
  • Parent and Teacher Relationship (Cottonwood Room)
    Diana Crump June
    • The presentation will provide new educators with strategies to open and maintain quality communication between home and school.
  • Case Study in Diversity: Developing a Strengths Based Classroom Perspective (Wildcat Chambers)
    Alaina Shelton
    • In this session we will examine the value of operating from a strengths-based perspective and we will analyze some of the tools we can use to shift away from a deficit-perspective. We will look at case studies from a teacher perspective on a variety of situations and share ideas, challenges, questions, and stories which will add to our understanding of the power and value of a strengths-based approach.
Questions?
785-532-5524